U.S. dollar

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The U.S. dollar is the currency of the United States of America and the world's reserve currency. The standard abbreviation is "USD" and the symbol is "$."

U.S. dollars are created by the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, which is operated by the U.S. Department of Treasury[1].

Treasury began issuing paper currency in 1861 and on August 29, 21862 the process was mechanized and moved to the basement of Treasury. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing, BEP, is the sole producer of legitimate U.S. dollar bills. BEP also produces stamps, U.S. government obligations and other security documents.

Who is featured in the portraits on U.S. paper currency?[2]

  • $1 Note (Face) - George Washington (1st U.S. President) (Back) - The Great Seal of the United States
  • $2 Note (Face) - Thomas Jefferson (3rd U.S. President) (Back) - Signing of the Declaration of Independence
  • $5 Note (Face) - Abraham Lincoln (16th U.S. President) (Back) - Lincoln Memorial
  • $10 Note (Face) - Alexander Hamilton (1st Secretary of the Treasury) (Back) - U.S. Treasury Building
  • $20 Note (Face) - Andrew Jackson (7th U.S. President) (Back) - White House
  • $50 Note (Face) - Ulysses Grant (18th U.S. President) (Back) - U.S. Capitol
  • $100 Note (Face) - Ben Franklin (Statesman) (Back) - Independence Hall
  • $500 Note* (Face) - William McKinley (25th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 500 and the ornamental phrase "Five Hundred Dollars"
  • $1000 Note* (Face) - Grover Cleveland (22nd & 24th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 1000 and the ornamental phrase "One Thousand Dollars"
  • $5000 Note* (Face) - James Madison (4th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 5000 and the ornamental phrase "Five Thousand Dollars"
  • $10,000 Note* (Face) - Salmon Chase (U.S. Treasury Secretary under Lincoln) (Back) - Numeral 10,000 and the ornamental phrase "Ten Thousand Dollars"
  • $100,000 Note* (Face) - Woodrow Wilson (28th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 100,000 and the ornamental phrase "One Hundred Thousand Dollars". This note never appeared in general circulation, and was only used in transactions between Federal Reserve Banks

(*) = Notes no longer in print or circulation

Coins and Medals

Coins and medals are produced by The United States Mint, which is also operated by the U.S. Department of Treasury. The U.S. Mint was created on April 2, 1792[3]. A variety of one dollar coins are in circulation as of August 2010, including the Statue of Liberty, George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison obverse coins.

References

  1. History. Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
  2. FAQ. Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
  3. About the United States Mint. The United States Mint.