Difference between revisions of "BlueMountain Capital Management LLC"

From MarketsWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Text replace - "{{helpAddContent}} <!-- Have a big article with lots of text? Remove this template! -->" to "")
Line 1: Line 1:
 
+
{{Random_adbox}}
 
{{Infobox_Company   
 
{{Infobox_Company   
 
| company_name = BlueMountain Capital Management LLC
 
| company_name = BlueMountain Capital Management LLC
Line 29: Line 29:
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
<references />
 
<references />
 +
 +
[[Category:Private Investment Firms]]

Revision as of 15:58, 24 October 2011

ICE wiki logo.jpg
BlueMountain Capital Management LLC
Headquarters New York and London
Key People Samuel Cole, Chief Operating Officer
Employees 130
Website www.bluemountaincapital.com

BlueMountain Capital Management LLC is a private investment firm with offices in New York and London. Its founders helped pioneer credit-default swaps.[1]

BlueMountain manages BlueMountain Credit Alternatives Fund, a relative-value fund that serves primarily institutional investors. The fund invests--both long and short--in the global credit markets, primarily through credit default swaps and other credit derivatives. It was launched in November 2003 by Andrew Feldstein, Stephen Siderow and Gery Sampere.

BlueMountain Capital Management is also one of the hedge fund founders of CMDX, the joint venture between the CME Group and Citadel Investment Group to clear credit default swaps. The venture has been in the works for almost a year but has not yet begun clearing the swaps. [2]

BlueMountain had earlier bought pieces of General Motors Corp.’s $4.5 billion credit line and purchased derivatives linked to GM’s unsecured debt that would pay out if the company defaults, according to a letter from BlueMountain to shareholders. (GM filed for bankruptcy protection on June 1, 2009.)


History

Products and Services

Key People

References

  1. BlueMountain Set to Earn $817 Million on Credit Swaps. Bloomberg.
  2. New clearing venture gets big backers, big foes. Crain's Chicago Business.