Difference between revisions of "Stanley Sporkin"

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Stanley Sporkin was known an aggressive enforcer of the U.S. securities laws for twenty years and served as general counsel at the Central Intelligence Agency before being named to the federal district court as a judge.  
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During his lifetime Stanley Sporkin was known a controversial if aggressive advocate for corporate ethics. He rose to prominence as an enforcement attorney for U.S. [[Securities and Exchange Commission]] (SEC). He went on to serve as general counsel at the Central Intelligence Agency before being named as a judge on Federal District Court in Washington D.C.  
  
 
== Personal ==
 
== Personal ==
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After serving as a clerk to a federal district judge in Delaware, Sporkin joined the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in 1961 to work on its ''Special Study of Securities Markets'' which was released in 1963. The study had been mandated by the U.S. Congress. Sporkin moved on to work for the SEC's Division of Trading and Markets. In that role, Sporkin eventually led the investigation into Robert Vesco who was charged with defrauding a mutual fund that he operated of $224 million. He became an associate director of the division where he was mentored by Irving Pollack, who eventually became the first SEC director of the Division of Enforcment when it was created in 1972 by then Chairman, William Casey. Sporkin followed Pollack into the enforcement division and eventually succeeded Pollack when he was named to the commission itself. <ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-24/stanley-sporkin-feared-head-of-sec-enforcement-unit-dies-at-88?sref=hsY0IYu4|name=Stanley Sporkin, Ex-Head of SEC Enforcement Unit, Dies at 88|org=Bloomberg|date=April 7, 2020}}</ref>   
 
After serving as a clerk to a federal district judge in Delaware, Sporkin joined the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in 1961 to work on its ''Special Study of Securities Markets'' which was released in 1963. The study had been mandated by the U.S. Congress. Sporkin moved on to work for the SEC's Division of Trading and Markets. In that role, Sporkin eventually led the investigation into Robert Vesco who was charged with defrauding a mutual fund that he operated of $224 million. He became an associate director of the division where he was mentored by Irving Pollack, who eventually became the first SEC director of the Division of Enforcment when it was created in 1972 by then Chairman, William Casey. Sporkin followed Pollack into the enforcement division and eventually succeeded Pollack when he was named to the commission itself. <ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-24/stanley-sporkin-feared-head-of-sec-enforcement-unit-dies-at-88?sref=hsY0IYu4|name=Stanley Sporkin, Ex-Head of SEC Enforcement Unit, Dies at 88|org=Bloomberg|date=April 7, 2020}}</ref>   
  
Sporkin became director of the SEC's enforcement division in 1974.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/24/business/stanley-sporkin-dead.html|name=Stanley Sporkin, Bane of Corporate Corruption, Dies at 88|org=New York Times|date=April 9, 2020}}</ref>  
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Sporkin became director of the SEC's Division of Enforcement 1974.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/24/business/stanley-sporkin-dead.html|name=Stanley Sporkin, Bane of Corporate Corruption, Dies at 88|org=New York Times|date=April 9, 2020}}</ref>  
 
   
 
   
  
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=== Judicial career ===
 
=== Judicial career ===
Sporkin was appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1995, where he maintained a high profile as a controversial jurist.  
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Sporkin was appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1995, where he maintained a high profile as a controversial jurist. He retired in 2000.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/sporkin-stanley|Name=Judges|org=Federal Judicial Center|date=April 9, 2020}}</ref>
  
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==== Microsoft ===
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in
  
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==== Mayor Marion Barry
  
  

Revision as of 12:47, 9 April 2020

FTSE Russell banner 2016.gif
Stanley Sporkin
Occupation Attorney (deceased)
Location Washington, D.C.
Website Homepage


During his lifetime Stanley Sporkin was known a controversial if aggressive advocate for corporate ethics. He rose to prominence as an enforcement attorney for U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). He went on to serve as general counsel at the Central Intelligence Agency before being named as a judge on Federal District Court in Washington D.C.

Personal

Sporkin was born in 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His mother was a homemaker. His father, Maurice, was an assistant district attorney and later a judge on the Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas who famously ordered the desegregation of a Philadelphia swimming pool in the 1950s. In a 2000 interview with the Washington Post, Sporkin said. “The whole concept I had of doing justice came from watching him, when he would do the right thing.”

Sporkin married Judith Imber and they had three children together. Mrs. Sporkin and their children survived him at his death on March 23, 2020, when Sporkin was 88 years old. [1]

Career

Before attending Yale Law School, Sporkin worked for about a year as an accountant.

Sporkin's first job after law school was with a law firm in Philadelphia. He later said that he was dismayed by clients' attitudes toward the law, saying “We’d tell a client that something was wrong, and then he’d ask, ‘But is it illegal?’”[2]

Enforcer at U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

After serving as a clerk to a federal district judge in Delaware, Sporkin joined the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in 1961 to work on its Special Study of Securities Markets which was released in 1963. The study had been mandated by the U.S. Congress. Sporkin moved on to work for the SEC's Division of Trading and Markets. In that role, Sporkin eventually led the investigation into Robert Vesco who was charged with defrauding a mutual fund that he operated of $224 million. He became an associate director of the division where he was mentored by Irving Pollack, who eventually became the first SEC director of the Division of Enforcment when it was created in 1972 by then Chairman, William Casey. Sporkin followed Pollack into the enforcement division and eventually succeeded Pollack when he was named to the commission itself. [3]

Sporkin became director of the SEC's Division of Enforcement 1974.[4]


CIA

Judicial career

Sporkin was appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1995, where he maintained a high profile as a controversial jurist. He retired in 2000.[5]

= Microsoft

in

==== Mayor Marion Barry


Background

Education

Sporkin graduated from Penn State University in 1953 with a degree in accounting. After working as an accountant for a year, he attended Yale Law School and received a JD in 1957.[6]

References

  1. Stanley Sporkin, crusading SEC enforcer and tough-minded U.S. judge, dies at 88. Washington Post.
  2. Stanley Sporkin, Bane of Corporate Corruption, Dies at 88. New York Times.
  3. Stanley Sporkin, Ex-Head of SEC Enforcement Unit, Dies at 88. Bloomberg.
  4. Stanley Sporkin, Bane of Corporate Corruption, Dies at 88. New York Times.
  5. {{{name}}}. Federal Judicial Center.
  6. Stanley Sporkin, Ex-Head of SEC Enforcement Unit, Dies at 88. Bloomberg.