Edmund Harold Goodison

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Edmund Harold Goodison

Edmund Harold Goodison (15 February 1904 – 1977) was a notable British stockbroker and a key figure in the financial markets of London. He was part of a prominent stockbroking family and played a significant role in the operations of the family firm, H.E. Goodison, which later became Quilter Goodison.

Background[edit]

Early Life and Education[edit]

Edmund Harold Goodison was born on 15 February 1904. He was the son of Henry Edmund Goodison and part of a lineage deeply entrenched in the stockbroking industry. His early life was marked by a strong family tradition in finance, which influenced his career path.[1][2][3]

Career[edit]

Goodison followed in the footsteps of his predecessors by entering the stockbroking profession. He became a partner in the family firm, H.E. Goodison, which was known for its traditional brokerage practices. The firm operated on a fixed commission basis and maintained a strict separation of roles in the securities markets, trading exclusively on behalf of clients and refraining from "own account" trading.

Family and Personal Life[edit]

Goodison married Eileen Mary Carrington Proctor, and they had a son, Nicholas Proctor Goodison, who would later become a significant figure in the financial world as the chairman of the London Stock Exchange. The Goodison family was known for their contributions to both the financial sector and the arts. Nicholas Goodison, in particular, was a notable supporter of the arts and held various prestigious positions in art institutions.[4]

Legacy[edit]

Goodison's legacy is closely tied to the family firm, H.E. Goodison, and its evolution into Quilter Goodison. His contributions to the firm helped maintain its reputation and operations during a period of significant change in the financial markets. The firm's adherence to traditional brokerage practices under his leadership was a hallmark of its operations until the transformative period of the "Big Bang" in 1986, which deregulated the financial markets in London.

Death[edit]

Edmund Harold Goodison passed away in 1977, leaving behind a legacy in the stockbroking industry that was carried forward by his son, Nicholas Goodison, who played a pivotal role in modernizing the London Stock Exchange.[5]

References[edit]

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