Sir Nicholas Goodison

From MarketsWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Straits Financial-370x90.png


Sir Nicholas Goodison

Sir Nicholas Proctor Goodison (16 May 1934 – 6 July 2021) was a distinguished British businessman, renowned for his transformative leadership as the chairman of the London Stock Exchange from 1976 to 1986. Beyond his contributions to the financial sector, Goodison was a passionate supporter of the arts, serving in various capacities to promote and preserve cultural heritage.[1][2][3]

Background[edit]

London Stock Exchange[edit]

Goodison joined the family stockbroking firm, H.E. Goodison (later Quilter Goodison), in 1958, becoming a partner in 1962. His leadership skills and vision for modernization led to his election to the Stock Exchange Council in 1968, making him the youngest member in the post-war era. In 1976, he was appointed Chairman of the London Stock Exchange, a position he held until 1986.

During his tenure, Goodison played a pivotal role in the "Big Bang" reforms of 1986, which revolutionized the City of London by deregulating the financial markets. These reforms abolished fixed commission charges, allowed outside ownership of member firms, and introduced electronic trading, significantly enhancing London's competitiveness as a global financial center.

Other Business Roles[edit]

After stepping down from the London Stock Exchange, Goodison continued to influence the financial sector. He served as chairman of TSB Group from 1988 to 1995 and as deputy chairman of Lloyds TSB Group from 1995 to 2000. He was also deputy chairman of British Steel and a director of General Accident.

Contributions to the Arts[edit]

Goodison's passion for the arts was evident through his extensive involvement in various cultural institutions. He served as chairman of the Courtauld Institute of Art from 1982 to 2002 and of the National Art Collections Fund (now The Art Fund) from 1986 to 2002. He was also a vice chairman of the English National Opera and a long-serving governor of Marlborough College.[4]

Goodison was an avid collector and scholar of 18th-century British furniture, clocks, and barometers. He authored several books on these subjects, including "English Barometers 1680-1860" and "Ormolu: The Work of Matthew Boulton."[5]

Personal Life[edit]

In 1960, Goodison married Judith Abel Smith, who descended from a Lincolnshire banking dynasty. The couple had a son, Adam, and two daughters, Katharine and Rachel. Goodison's personal interests included music, particularly church music, and he was known for his deep knowledge and appreciation of the visual and decorative arts.

Education[edit]

He received his early education at Marlborough College, a prestigious independent school. Goodison then attended King's College, Cambridge, where he read Classics and became an honorary fellow later in life.

References[edit]

John Lothian News logo1.png

@JohnLothian Twitter Feed

@JohnLothian: nytimes.com/2024/06/20/bus…
https://t.co/Y6lNF2ctxN— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

@JohnLothian: bbc.com/news/articles/…
https://t.co/5blHqJ7f1c— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

@JohnLothian: Paris Gets a Wild Meme Stock as Atos Becomes a Chatroom Favorite uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/paris-get… via @Yahoo
Paris Gets a Wild Meme Stock as Atos Becomes a Chatroom Favorite https://t.co/8BAPXdy0aC via @Yahoo— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

@JohnLothian: Retail investors are turning to bonds like never before and brokerages want in
Retail investors are turning to bonds like never before and brokerages want in - MarketWatch https://t.co/Uv9zc5JtPF— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

@JohnLothian: Once esoteric, liquid-cooling technology will become essential in data centers with Nvidia’s newest AI chips
Once esoteric, liquid-cooling technology will become essential in data centers with Nvidia’s newest AI chips - MarketWatch https://t.co/sHpweVSFXY— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

@JohnLothian: How Putin rebuilt Russia’s war machine with help from U.S. adversaries - The Wall Street Journal apple.news/AgTxV1r_jS8qEn…
How Putin rebuilt Russia’s war machine with help from U.S. adversaries - The Wall Street Journal https://t.co/FoEnA68xGm— John Lothian (@JohnLothian) June 20, 2024

View Page

We visit more than 100 websites daily for financial news (Would YOU do that?). Read the John Lothian Newsletter.