Difference between revisions of "Islamic bonds"

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(New page: {{helpAddContent}} Islamic bonds, or sukuk, conform to Shariah law, which requires that investors profit only from transactions based on the exchange of assets, not money alone; therefor...)
 
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Islamic bonds, or sukuk, conform to Shariah law, which requires that investors profit only from transactions based on the exchange of assets, not money alone; therefore, interest is banned.  
Islamic bonds, or sukuk, conform to Shariah law, which requires that investors profit only from transactions based on the exchange of [[assets]], not money alone; therefore, [[interest]] is banned.  


Bankers sell Islamic bonds, or sukuk, by using property and other assets to generate income equivalent to interest they would pay on conventional debt. The money cannot be used to finance gambling, guns or alcohol.  
[[Bankers]] sell Islamic bonds by using property and other assets to generate income equivalent to interest they would pay on conventional [[debt]]. The money can't be used to finance gambling, guns or alcohol.  
 
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=a.DsH16oTM6U&refer=home


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Revision as of 18:59, 30 December 2008


Islamic bonds, or sukuk, conform to Shariah law, which requires that investors profit only from transactions based on the exchange of assets, not money alone; therefore, interest is banned.

Bankers sell Islamic bonds by using property and other assets to generate income equivalent to interest they would pay on conventional debt. The money can't be used to finance gambling, guns or alcohol.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=a.DsH16oTM6U&refer=home


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